Why Windows 7 updates are getting bigger

Windows 7’s security rollups, the most comprehensive of the fixes it pushes out each Patch Tuesday, have doubled in size since Microsoft revamped the veteran operating system’s update regimen in 2016.

According to Microsoft’s own data, what it calls the “Security Quality Monthly Rollup” (rollup from here on) grew by more than 90% from the first to the twenty-first update. From its October 2016 inception, the x86 version of the update increased from 72MB to 137.5MB, a 91% jump. Meanwhile, the always-larger 64-bit version went from an initial 119.4MB to 227.5MB, also representing a 91% increase.

The swelling security updates were not, in themselves, a surprise. Last year, when Microsoft announced huge changes to how it services Windows 7, it admitted that rollups would put on the pounds. “The Rollups will start out small, but we expect that these will grow over time,” Nathan Mercer, a Microsoft product marketing manager, said at the time. Mercer’s explanation: “A Monthly Rollup in October will include all updates for October, while November will include October and November updates, and so on.”

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from Computerworld News https://www.computerworld.com/article/3242745/microsoft-windows/why-windows-7-updates-are-getting-bigger.html#tk.rss_news
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Is mobile sensor-based authentication ready for the enterprise? Some big players think it might be.

An Arizona security company is working on an interesting approach to mobile authentication, one that leverages the exact angle a user holds the phone as a means of making replay attacks a lot more difficult. Aetna has been testing the method internally (according to the security company’s CEO) and the company — Trusona — has announced about $18 million in funding, from Microsoft Ventures ($10 million) and Kleiner, Perkins, Caufield and Byers ($8 million).

The Microsoft Ventures funding is interesting because one of the more popular mobile authentication methods today is Microsoft’s Authenticator app. Is Redmond covering its bases, or does it see the Trusona effort as threatening to displace Authenticator, at least in the enterprise IT world?

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from Computerworld News https://www.computerworld.com/article/3290366/mobile-wireless/is-mobile-sensor-based-authentication-ready-for-the-enterprise-some-big-players-think-it-might-be.html#tk.rss_news
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The EU’s Android antitrust ruling overlooks 3 critical points

Is Google abusing its power as the gatekeeper to Android? Antitrust regulators in Europe seem to think so — but reading over their ruling, I can’t help but be struck by some inconsistencies between their assessments and the realities of Google’s mobile platform.

In case you’ve been napping for the past couple days, the European Union slapped Google with a $5 billion dollar fine as part of an antitrust investigation. The EU says Google is stifling competition by forcing phone-makers to preinstall Chrome and Google Search on their Android devices as part of a broader package of Google services — and by preventing partners from developing devices based on unofficial “forks” of Android (spoons, thankfully, are still permitted). Google has already announced plans to appeal.

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from Computerworld News https://www.computerworld.com/article/3291316/android/eu-android-antitrust-ruling.html#tk.rss_news
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Why two Apple HomePods really are better than one

Apple recently updated its HomePod software, introducing AirPlay 2 and support for stereo pairing. I’ve been using these features since they arrived, and this is what I think so far:

What are the improvements?

Apple’s iOS 11.4 update introduced HomePod 11.4 which bought two significant new features to HomePod systems: AirPlay 2 and stereo pairing support.

AirPlay 2

AirPlay 2 lets you control music playback around your home using Siri, HomePod and AirPlay 2 supporting speaker systems from third party manufacturers. So long as all your systems are on the same Wi-Fi network you get multi-room playback and controls.

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from Computerworld News https://www.computerworld.com/article/3290363/apple-ios/why-two-apple-homepods-really-are-better-than-one.html#tk.rss_news
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